Play Too Fast Series – 7



Dealer: W North
J 8 4
A J 8 7 3
5 3
Q 8 3
 

  East
6
9 6 5 4
A Q 10 9 8 6
A 10
 
 
Lead: K
Bidding:
 
WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
Pass Pass 1 2
2 3 Pass 5
All Pass      
       

By Mike Lawrence

Against five clubs, West chose the king of hearts.  This surprise attack was not immediately effective.  Dummy won the ace and ruffed a heart at trick two with the five of clubs.  Next came the jack of clubs from South.  East spotted that he might get a spade ruff so he took the club and returned his six of spades.  Do you agree?  That was not the best defense.  Take a look at the four hands.



Dealer: W North
J 8 4
A J 8 7 3
5 3
Q 8 3
 
West
Q 7 5 3 2
K Q 10
K J 7 2
4

  East
6
9 6 5 4
A Q 10 9 8 6
A 10
  South
A K 10 9
2
4
K J 9 7 6 5 2
 
Lead: K
Bidding:
 
WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH
Pass Pass 1 2
2 3 Pass 5
All Pass      
       

South took the spade return, went to dummy with the queen of clubs, and ruffed another heart in his hand.  This dropped West’s queen.  The eight of clubs was the needed entry to the hearts so South was able to discard his two spade losers.

Do you see how the defense could have prevailed?  All East has to do is let South win the king of clubs.  This play will definitely stop South from setting up and using the hearts.  If West has a spade trick, almost a guarantee on this bidding, five clubs will go down.  A snap decision by East was the loser, as it is so often.  

In the bidding, East had a decision to make in third seat. Should he open one diamond or two diamonds or should he pass?

East hated to open two diamonds in third seat with this good a hand and with a four card major on the side so tried one diamond instead.  
This is an acceptable evaluation but it caused his side to defend against five clubs rather than bid to five diamonds, which has excellent chances of making.  Perhaps East should have bid three diamonds over three clubs. Perhaps West should have bid five diamonds over five clubs.  So many ifs.  

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